Species Composition and Biting Activities of Mosquitoes in a Selected Community in Anambra State, Southeast Nigeria

E. O. Ogbuefi *

Department of Parasitology and Entomology, Faculty of Biosciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

B. C. Umeh

Department of Parasitology and Entomology, Faculty of Biosciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

C. O. Aniefuna

Department of Parasitology and Entomology, Faculty of Biosciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

C. A. Chidi-Okeke

Department of Public Health, Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom.

O. V. Emma-Ogbuefi

Department of Medical Services, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra, Nigeria.

C. J. Mbanugo

Department of Parasitology and Entomology, Faculty of Biosciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Mosquitoes are common biting and sucking arthropods whose females bite man and animals for their blood meal which leads to itching and causes diseases. The study investigated the species composition and biting activities of mosquitoes at Ifite-Awka, Awka South Local Government Area, Anambra State, south east Nigeria. The study was carried out between November and December, 2021 and the mosquitoes were collected using the Human Landing Catch (HLC) and Pyrethrum Spray Collection Method (PSC), whereas Larval Sampling (LS) method was used to collect the immature stages of mosquito. The HLC was carried out from 5:00pm to 8:00pm and the biting peak was observed from 5:45pm to 7:00pm. A total of 158 adult mosquitoes were collected which comprised of 3 species namely Culex quinquefasciatus, Anophles gambiae and Mansonia africana. Culex quinquefasciatus was the most abundant species irrespective of the method of collection which was attributed to their anthropohilic, endophagic and endophilic nature. Pyrethrum Spray Collection method (PKC) produced the highest species of 120 mosquitoes which constitute of 75.83% (91/158) Culex quinquefasciatus, 22.5% (27/158) Anopheles gambiae and 1.66% (2/158) Mansonia africana. The HLC method caught mosquitoes of two different species which was Culex quinquefasciatus 89.29% (25/28) and Mansonia africana 10.71% (3/28). The Larval Sampling method caught 10 Culex quinquefasciatus. Although there was no significant difference among the methods of collection (p>0.05), but in the distribution of the mosquitoes species, there was a significant difference (p<0.05) among the seven (7) lodges sampled. The study observed high exposure to mosquitoes and the possibility of epidemics of mosquito - borne diseases among Ifite-Awka residents. The need for proper health education, immediate and effective control measures of the mosquito vectors, which includes environmental sanitation is highly advised. 

Keywords: Biting activities, specie composition, mosquitoes, Anambra State


How to Cite

Ogbuefi , E. O., Umeh , B. C., Aniefuna , C. O., Chidi-Okeke , C. A., Emma-Ogbuefi , O. V., & Mbanugo , C. J. (2023). Species Composition and Biting Activities of Mosquitoes in a Selected Community in Anambra State, Southeast Nigeria. Asian Journal of Research in Zoology, 6(3), 16–25. https://doi.org/10.9734/ajriz/2023/v6i3112

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