Survey, Consumption Methods and Uses of Edible Forest Insects in Selected Local Government Areas, Cross River State, Nigeria

A. O. Alobi

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria.

O. I. Ovat *

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria.

K. E. Ovat

Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Cross University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

The survey and consumption methods of edible forest insects was investigated within a period of eight months. Information on respondents’ demography, availability, harvesting methods and uses was collected using questionnaire and field survey. Data generated was analysed using frequency tables, charts and bar diagrams. Females (51%) were higher in number than males (49%) in the collection of edible forest insects, with over 70 percent of the collectors haven’t completed their secondary (46%) and tertiary (32%) education. The main preservation and consumption methods were roasting and frying, with majority of the people utilizing the insects majorly as food ingredients and sweetener. Most of the insects identified were consumed at adult stage, with exception of caterpillar that was consumed at larval stage. In all the locations and with the exception of termites and crickets which were available during the rainy and dry seasons, respectively, all other insects identified were available all year round. There was a strong positive relationship interms of insect availability, collection methods and uses between Akamkpa and Obubra (rs = 0.089), Obubra and Ogoja (rs – 0.689). The was not the same for Ogoja and Akamkpa (rs = 0.352), as well as ogoja and Obubra (rs = 0.102), respectively.

Keywords: Survey, consumption, insects, edible, forest


How to Cite

Alobi, A. O., Ovat, O. I., & Ovat, K. E. (2022). Survey, Consumption Methods and Uses of Edible Forest Insects in Selected Local Government Areas, Cross River State, Nigeria. Asian Journal of Research in Zoology, 5(4), 23–31. https://doi.org/10.9734/ajriz/2022/v5i496

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